Tag: Newmarket

Amid shortage, women coaches thrive in Division IV

By Mike Whaley

Wednesday was a big evening for high school girls’ basketball coaches in New Hampshire. Three of the four coaches in the NHIAA Division IV semifinals were women, which is something to celebrate in a state where women are vastly under-represented in that profession.

No. 3 Derryfield held off No. 2 Pittsburg-Canaan in overtime in the first semifinal at Newfound High School, 47-40, while unbeaten No. 1 seed Concord Christian dispatched No. 4 Woodsville, 64-44, in the second game.

Concord Christian Head Coach Rebecca Carlile.

Rebecca Carlile’s CCA squad will meet Courtney Cheetham’s Derryfield five in the championship Sunday at Keene State College at 1 p.m. – a rarity in N.H. for two women coaches to face off in a basketball championship game.

The third female coach in Wednesday’s mix was Woodsville’s Tori Clough, who, at 24, is one of the youngest coaches in the state.

Farmington coach Dawn Weeks was excited about the semis with three women patrolling the sidelines. “Being one of few, it drives us to work that much harder,” she said.

Of New Hampshire’s 85 varsity high school girls’ basketball head coaching positions, only 17 – or 20 percent – are held by women. In Maine, the percentage is 28.

Newmarket Head Coach Meghan Averill.

Cheetham was ecstatic about the opportunity to coach against other women, especially in the tournament. “I just coached against (Newmarket’s) Meghan Averill,” she said of her team’s quarterfinal win over the Mules. “She’s my coach of the year in Division IV. She’s another female who is right there. She’s great.”

She added,” I think it’s really good for girls’ sports. … It’s good to see a decent amount of female coaches in the south.” Of the 17 women’s varsity hoop coaches in the state, seven are in D-IV, five in D-III, three in D-II and two in D-I.

“I think it’s good for kids to see some role-modeling,” Cheetham said. 

Woodsville Head Coach Tori Clough.

Clough, in her first year as a head coach, knew it would be a challenge against Concord Christian. “Rebecca Carlile has done such a great job with her team,” she said. “If we can just hang with them, that would be a successful first year in my book.

“Rebecca, Courtney, Meghan Averill from Newmarket, I look up to all of them,” said Clough, a 2016 Woodsville grad. “They have such great teams and they do such a nice job with them.”

“I think it’s amazing,” Carlile said. “I think it’s great. Anytime you see women being empowered to use their gifts and talents, what she’s passionate about. … I love to see women doing what they’re doing and not feeling like they can’t do it because it’s a men’s job.

“I also think it’s a great opportunity for the girls to see women doing something that they are passionate about, that they’re knowledgeable about, and they’re willing to instill what they know on a younger generation.”

SMALL FRATERNITY, BIG CHALLENGES

But the fact remains that women make up a small part of New Hampshire’s basketball coaching landscape.

Why is that? Are women not applying? Are they not being considered or even encouraged? Does the climate turn them off? Is it more difficult for women to coach in an environment stocked with so many men? There is a lot of speculation. 

Although armed with no specific answers, Dover High School Athletic Director Peter Wotton did note that the New Hampshire Athletic Directors Association (NHADA) will be dealing with similar subjects at its spring conference in May. “We’ll be looking at gender equity, Title IX and how to increase participation in females in sports,” he said. “We didn’t specifically mention basketball, but it is something we are going to be talking about as a group at our conference. It is something we do recognize in general.”

That being said, the position of athletic director in the state is another that is held mostly by men. Of the 88 high schools in the state, 12 have women ADs.

Speaking for Dover, Wotton said a woman has not been a head hoop coach at the school since he’s been there, which dates back to the mid 1990s. “I’m trying to think back,” he said. “We’ve had maybe a couple applicants. But only one good one, one that was close (to getting hired).”

Wotton said there is a common misconception from the general public that schools are receiving dozens of applicants for coaching positions. “If we get five, six, seven, eight, it’s oh my god, I can’t believe we have this many,” he said. “This is great.”

The opposite, however, is usually the case. “We’ve had head positions of significant sports that we got one or two,” Wotton said. “We’ve had one before.”

Dover is currently advertising for a new head girls’ basketball coach. 

New Hampshire Basketball Coaches Organization President Dave Chase agreed with that assessment. “The first thing I would say: it’s hard to get male coaches,” he said. “Times have changed. It’s a bigger commitment. I don’t think anyone is saying they don’t want to hire a female to coach basketball. There are so few women that are getting into it. I really don’t know why.”

It is a topic, however, that Chase intends to put on the agenda for the next NHBCO meeting on March 12.

He also pointed out that the NHBCO right now just has Averill (treasurer) as one of its four officers. The organization is currently looking for a vice president and secretary. “We’re begging,” he said. “It’s tough to get women to do it if there’s not a lot of women coaching.”

Derryfield Head Coach Courtney Cheetham (center).

Cheetham did note that before Derryfield, where she is in her second year as the head coach, she was the head coach at D-I Merrimack for six years. She had some pretty good success there, and was named coach of the year in her final season (2017-18).

She took a year off from coaching, but then put her name back out there in 2019. “I applied for other jobs the next year and I didn’t get them, which is funny to me,” she said.

Now she’s happy she didn’t get any of those jobs because she enjoys coaching at Derryfield so much, where she is also the Director of Wellness.

Certainly another reason that is universal is that some women want to have families. Carlile falls under that category. A 1994 graduate of Alvirne High School, she played basketball at Southern Nazarene University in the mid to late 1990s (two-time NAIA national champs). Coaching basketball wasn’t even on her radar until she was approaching 40.

Even then it came more out of necessity than anything else.

She was watching her son and then daughter play youth basketball, and not enjoying the experience. She finally decided she could bring more to the table with her past expertise to help out the well-meaning, but less knowledgeable volunteer coaches when her daughter was in third grade.  “It got to the point where I’ve just got to help here,” Carlile said.

Eventually that evolved into coaching CCA’s middle school team for two years, and then she was approached to coach the high school team three years ago. “It’s not like people are banging down doors to get coaching positions,” she said.

That coincided with a rejuvenation of sports at CCA. The school had built a new athletic facility. “There was extra energy,” she said. “There was some extra effort focused on winning, honestly. We can win and be Christian. We can be loving and kind and still win. That’s been fun to watch the last couple of years.”

As much as her first year as a head coach has been a great experience for Clough, it does provide insight into some of the challenges a young female coach faces.

“It was a lot,” said Clough, who played for and worked under male coaches at Woodsville. “I won’t lie. I’m coaching against the coaches I played against six, seven years ago.” 

She was able to use some of those coaches as resources like Littleton’s Dale Prior and Groveton’s Tim Haskins. “It was fun to have them as mentors this year,” Clough said. “They’ve kind of helped me along; given me some tips. It’s nice when you can look up to those coaches.”

Clough felt it was a good change for Woodsville having a young woman coach. “I know the kids appreciate having a female role model now,” she said. “It feels different as a young female coach. You look around and it’s all the typical middle-aged males.”

Clough is a patched basketball official in Vermont, and there are very few women officials in that state. The case is the same in N.H.

“It’s daunting to be a young female trying to do anything right now,” she said. “It’s nice to have the men to support me and it’s nice that they do. But I wish that I would see more females.”

Clough recalls it was a battle when she first started as the head coach. “I don’t think people trust you as much as they would a middle-aged male,” she said. “We definitely have to earn people’s respect much more than a middle-aged male would. I know that sounds crazy, but it’s true.

“I see that in officiating and I see it in coaching, too,” Clough said. “I step onto the floor to officiate and (she gets the look) – ‘it seems like she looks really young.’ I do just as good a job as a 50-year-old man.”

Along the same lines, Cheetham found it funny when she began coaching at the Division IV level. She was learning who some of the referees were. “Ninety-five percent of the time everybody would walk over to my assistant (a man) and introduce themselves,” she said. “They thought he was the head coach. And every time he’d point to me – ‘She’s the coach.’ There’s this assumption that he was the coach. Why him?”

She added, “This is no knock on referees because I’m a patched referee myself,” she said. “I’ve got a lot of respect for referees.”

“It’s tough that we have to earn that respect, to earn people’s trust to have faith in us, when we do just as good a job,” Clough said. “I think that keeps a lot of females from hanging around. We have to work extra hard for something that a man doesn’t have to” because of who they are.”

Even now, Clough isn’t sure what future coaching path she will take. She’s also involved with high school soccer, and feels she could pursue that with or instead of basketball.

Farmington Head Coach Dawn Weeks.

Weeks sees challenges in regards to a few of the male coaches she deals with, although most of her relationships are very good. However, there are a few men who won’t shake her hand or share scouting information. She recalls, as well, trying fervently to get a timeout in a game and could not get a male official’s attention. She was only awarded the timeout when her male counterpart finally was able to catch the official’s eye.

Another important advantage for Clough is her flexibility as a teacher. She teaches third grade at nearby Monroe Consolidated School. That allows her to get to practice and games without impacting her job, something that cannot be said for those who do not work in education.

Ditto for Cheetham and Pinkerton Academy’s Lani Buskey, who work in the school systems where they coach. Carlile has maintained her coaching flexibility working part-time for her family’s business.

“My players have more of a comfortable friendship personally with me,” Clough said. “They’ll share things with me that I say ‘Would you have shared that with a male coach?’ They tell stories. They’re so comfortable and relaxed. I haven’t seen that in the past when there was a male coach. They take advice from me, whether it’s coaching or life advice. It’s kind of nice to think I could be a role model for them.”

WOMEN COACHES EMPOWERING GIRLS

Buskey is one of two D-I coaches, recently leading her team to the D-I semifinals. She was named D-I Coach of the year for the third time.

A 1998 graduate of Pinkerton, Buskey played basketball for the Astros. She has taught English and coached basketball at the Derry school for the past 19 years. This was her ninth season as the varsity coach.

She has no answers as to why there are so few women’s hoop coaches in the state. “Knowing that there are not a lot of us, I take the role very seriously because I know I’m one of few,” Buskey said. “For me, understanding that representation matters in all forms, I really try to be the kind of leader that girls can look at and see themselves doing that. They can see a strong female in a leadership role doing it correctly, holding the whole program accountable and being successful at it. I think that’s important for girls.”

It’s an important point that the other coaches agree with.

“My theme in life, whether coaching or not, is to help people get to their potential or help them maximize their potential,” Cheetham said. “That’s my life coaching mentality. I always like to find that everybody is awesome.”

While Cheetham feels it’s important to expose kids to different voices whether they’re male or female, she is convinced that having strong, passionate female coaches are necessary role models to help impact the future of young women. “I do believe there is a role-modeling component,” she said. “And me being a female I might have the opportunity to do what someone who is male couldn’t.”

Weeks expanded on her take on accountability. A 1991 graduate of Farmington High School, where she was a player, she has been a girls’ head hoop for 10 years, the last nine at Farmington. “We have these ‘Come-to-Jesus’ moments when we sit at center court if I’m aggravated about something,” she said. “I don’t sugar coat anything. That’s not real life. Is it the teacher’s fault that you failed the exam? That’s not the teacher’s fault. It’s about accountability and ownership. It’s about realizing in real life that you’re going to have to work harder than everybody else. You can’t make excuses. And start now. Put on your big girl pants and own it.”

Weeks goes on to say, “I do want to be a good role model. I kind of lead by example and send the right message empowering them: don’t set limits on yourself. You can do anything you want to do.”

Shared experience is at the top of the list. As ex-players and as women, some women coaches feel they can offer insight because they went through some of the same stuff.

“I can say, ‘I’ve been here and here is how I handled it,’” Buskey said. “‘This is how you could approach it if you wanted to.’ I do think that’s the advantage of a female coaching another female. It makes communication or our delivery of things a small advantage over our male counterparts because I’ve been there before. I’ve walked in their shoes.”

“So much about teaching and coaching is about your own personal experience,” said Cheetham, 37, who played at Trinity High School. “Good or bad, I can relate to what it’s like to be a female athlete more than a man can. … I know what it’s like to be in their shoes. That’s a valuable perspective to have people who have similar experiences they can share.”

Carlile has a different take on a similar theme. “For me, I didn’t handle them well,” she said of some of her decisions made when she was younger. “I was facing it and here’s how I wished I handled it. Kids are kids. They don’t know. You do the best to help them and work them through the issues. I’m sure that perspective definitely affects my coaching.”

As for being a good coach for female athletes, Cheetham feels it is key to “understand how each of them ticks as individuals. It’s very different from coaching male athletes. Coaching female athletes you have to really understand each kid as an individual and how they want to be coached and how you can get the most out of them. I think that’s where I would have the slightest advantage as a female just trying to understand that.”

Carlile says that “Psychology 101” is her biggest coaching asset. “Getting kids to work hard for you and want to work for a common goal is as valuable as knowing Xs and Os on the basketball court,” she said. 

Carlile feels that coaches who focus on Xs and Os and drill their kids to improve their skill and win games ultimately get unhappy kids who don’t want to play for them. “That’s an aspect of coaching that I love,” she said. “Trying to figure out how to get these kids to want to work together and want to work hard for you. I don’t know that every coach is even aware that’s a big aspect of the game. I think it is.”

 Part of the job can also be forging a path for the next generation of women coaches.

One of Cheetham’s former players at Merrimack, Abby Yuan, fits in that category. A solid player and good leader in high school, she has a scholarship at St. John’s University as a basketball manager. Yuan is graduating this spring and plans to pursue a career in coaching. Cheetham said Yuan will apply for different graduate assistant jobs at the Division I college level.

“She’s a great example of a kid who came up, wasn’t the best player, but was able to understand the value of female leadership and empowerment seen around her and then take it in,” Cheetham said.

Buskey talks about a former player, Ashley Hugh, who is one of her assistants. “She’s a sponge,” the coach said. “She’s constantly trying to take in our culture and how we approach things. I work really hard to build relationships with my girls. She’s also working to find a way to do that.”

Another woman who played at Pinkerton when Buskey was an assistant, Laura Pierce, is now the head women’s coach at Fitchburg State University. “I was around for her,” Buskey said. “She coaches at the college level and she used to work at my camps. She’s a fantastic coach. Coming back to some of those camps along the way helped her hone in on some of the advantages you can have to be a strong female coaching a female program.”

“For me, the mission is let’s play good basketball and let’s make you really great basketball players,” Buskey said. “So let’s make you even stronger, confident women to go out in the world and change it.”

In New Hampshire, the fraternity of women coaching girls’ basketball remains small but, for the most part, committed to their craft and the empowerment of their girls.

For feedback or story ideas, email jamsession@ball603.com.

Holy Family comes from behind to advance to semifinals

Sixth-seeded Holy Family trailed by 12 at the half, but outscored #14 Newmarket in the second half 38-17 to earn a 58-49 come-from-behind win in the quarterfinals of the NHIAA Division IV Boys Basketball State Tournament in Manchester on Thursday night.

Holy Family was led by Yves Mugiraneza (20 points) and Gabe Lacasse (18), while Newmarket was paced by a game-high 23 points from Colby Bost. The Griffins advance to the semifinals and will take on top-seeded Concord Christian.

Farmington closes regular-season with key win over Newmarket

Farmington held Newmarket to just three points in the first quarter and 13 in the first half as the Tigers won a pivotal Division IV match-up on Tuesday night, 46-39. Farmington, which was led by Jordan Berko’s 11 points, finishes the regular-season at 11-7. Behind a game-high 13 points apiece from Colby Bost and Baris Fortier, the Mules wrap up the regular-season at 9-9.

Check out the full photo gallery…

1K point scorers in the 603

On the heels of Mike Whaley’s recent three-part series of The Jam Session that took an in-depth look at the 2,000 point scorer, we’re looking to create an all-time NHIAA 1,000-point scorers list.

Thanks to our local historian Whaley, we have been able to get a jump start on the list (see below), but we need your help! Send us your 1,000-point scorer’s list (boys and girls), so we can add your school to the list. Simply take a photo of the 1,000 point banner in your gym or send us a list. We’re hoping to get the total points scored (if known) and the year of graduation.

Send your lists to us at kj@ball603.com.

Concord1K

Image 1 of 20

Here’s what we’ve got so far

BEDFORD
Isabella King (1,115 • 2021)
Cam Meservey (1,122 • 2014)

BOW
Erica Kensey (2000)
Heather LaBranche (2000)
Jen Haubrich (2002)
Eric Riggs (2002)
Mike Chergey (2006)
Katelyn Nerbonne (2006)
Paul Chergey (2006)
Brian Chergey (2008)
Lindsey Nerbonne (2013)

COE-BROWN
Andy Noyes (1975)
Joe Sims (1978)
Wade Sauls (1984)
Ginger Sanford (1989)
Kelly Hall (1993)
Todd Peterson (1993)
Jen Robinson (1996)
Emily Liskow (1998)
Kyle Purinton (1999)
Brandon Boggs (2002)
Ashley Cooper (2004)
Stacey Kent (2005)

CONANT
Keith Johnson (1979)
Darin Hood (1980)
Paul Asel (1982)
Dave Springfield (1985)
Scott Baldwin (1986)
Mindy Stenberg (1988)
Kari Hunt (1995)
Karen Belletete (1996)
Craig Griffin (1998)
Andy Jones (2001)
Betsy Oswalt (2001)
Justen Nagle (2002)
Kathleen Neyens (2005)
Kyle Todd (2008)
Jimmy Peard (2010)
Brooke Springfield (2011)
Devin Springfield (2013)
Madison Springfield (2015)
Peyton Springfield (2019)
Elizabeth Gonyea (2020)

CONCORD
Hap Simpson (1,030 • 1948)
Joe Drinon (1,016 • 1962)
Jen Shadlick (1,050 • 1996)
Bill Haubrich (1,066 • 1971)
Jane Haubrich (1,047 • 1981)
Champ Simpson (1,155 • 1975)
Glenn Mathews (1,082 • 1984)
Matt Chotkowski (1,009 • 1995)
Matt Bonner (2,459 • 1999)
Becky Bonner (1,550 • 2000)
Kalen Marquis (1,036 • 2013)
Matt Giroux (1,170 • 2017)

CONVAL
Phillip Abbott (1,064 • 1978)
Todd Burgess (1,390 • 1984)
Hunter Burgess (1,048 • 1989)
Jon Tirone (1,124 • 1989)
Jon Horne (1,106 • 1991)
Christine Jutras (1,389 • 1994)
Jaime Leflem (1,856 • 1995)
Veronica Jutras (1,111 • 1996)
Brett Leflem (1,374 • 1997)
Danielle Statuto (1,341 • 2000)
Lindsey Carey (1,206 • 2019)

DOVER
Stu LaFramboise (1968)
Karen Vitko (1979 • 1,179)
Lynne Richard (1979 • 1,075)
Scott Leighton (1981)
Kevin Crowell (1987)
Jeff Pierce (1991)
Jill Downer (1998 • 1,192)
Jessica Clark (2001 • 1,137)
Seana Boyle (2002 • 1,090)
Shavar Bernier (2004)
Curran Leighton (2009 • 1,212)
Katrina Krenzer (1,074 • 2019)
Ty Vitko (1,159 • 2019)

EPPING
Lionel Levesque (1965)
Butch Langdon (1966)
Maureen Denyou (1983)
Kerry Bascom (1985)
Ryan Gatchell (1990)
Julie Freeman (1990)
Denny Wood (1991)
Matt Price (1998)
Samantha Newton (2002)
Shauna Mullenix (2002)
Ryan Newman (2003)
Chris Crowley (2008)
Meghan Fiore (2008)
Frank Stanley (2013)
Jimmy Stanley (2014)
Colby Wilson (2016)
Jackson Rivers (2017)
Hunter Bullock (2019)
Owen Finkelstein (2022)

FALL MOUNTAIN
Patrick Aumand (1,495 • 1973)
Karolyn Domini (1,240 • 1984)
Jason Waysville (2005 • 1994)
Morgan Ferland (1,016 • 2015)
Ryan Murdoch (1,030 • 2015)
Avery Stewart (1,108 • 2021)

FARMINGTON
Len Auclair (1960)
Danny Reynolds (1970 • 1,217)
Paul Moulton (1970)
Gary Boulay (1979 • 1,169)
Casey Howard (1984 • 1,138)
Steve Mosher (1986 • 1,385)
Julie Gagne (1990 • 1,432)
Kristy Woodill (1996 • 1,848)
Tim Lee (1998 • 2,146)
Nick Doyle (2001 • 1,052)
Jayson Whitehouse (2004 • 1,579)
Tabby Whitehouse (2010 • 1,015)
Katie Martineau (2017 • 1,779)

FRANKLIN
Larry Dustin (1965)
Bryan Baker (1974)
Dan Sylvester (1983)
Michelle Brusseau (1987)
Shelley Winters (1993)
Karen Malsbenden (1994)
Bryan Aube (1997)
Nate Bickford (1999)
Nicole Parenteau (2001)
Mason Roberge (2007)
Dana Bean (2016)
Kenny Torres (2016)
Jayden Torres (2018)

GOFFSTOWN
David Wildman (1,396 • 1965)
Richard Fields (1,044 • 1966)
Gregory Pappas (1,091 • 1971)
Walter Foote (1,145 • 1974)
John Stone (1,140 • 1978)
Kelly Walsh (1,780 • 2021)

HINSDALE
Mike Kerylow (1957)
Del Blanchette (1957)
Sleepy Brooks (1958)
Gary Beaman (1963)
Joe Sarsfield (1972)
Larry Scott (1975)
Jason Dillon (1994)
Julie Messenger (2000)
Steve Deschenes (2001)
Allison Scott (2014)
Skylar Bonnette (2014)
Matthew Boggio (2016)
Skyler LeClair (2017)
Angelina Nardolillo (2019)

HOPKINTON
Bruce Johnson (1970)
Royal Ford (1992)
Evan Johnson (1992)
Jeff Adams (1994)
Beth Beckett (1995)
Amy West (2001)
Sarah Wofsy (2002)
Katie Barthelmes (2004)
Ryan Callahan (2004)
Kelly Flynn (2007)
Hannah Richard (2010)
Kevin Newton-Delgad0 (2020)

KEARSARGE
Tom Brayshaw (2,117 • 1989)
Steve Lavolpicelo (2,372 • 1999)
Bob Allen (1978)
David Bartlett (1989)
Stephanie Manus (1990)
Peter Lavolpicelo (1995)
Debbie Taylor (1995)
Tracy Fuller (1998)
Christine Gassman (1999)
Kristen Lucek (2002)
Andrew Ferreira (2006)
Marilyn Ferreira (2007)
Tommy Johnson (2018)
Tayler Mattos (2018)

KEENE
Jeff Holmes (1,275 • 1983)
Jim McGilvery (1,044 • 1992)
Tomy Depalo (1,235 • 1999)
Pat Luptowski (1,299 • 2007)
Camryn Warner (1,000 • 2010)
Ashley Clough (1,271 • 2012)
Logan Galanes (1,112 • 2017)

KINGSWOOD
Greg Dollarhide (1,057 • 1981)
Craig Vezina (1,750 • 1992)
Nicole LaBelle (1,443 • 1993)
Josh Tetreault (1,578 • 2000)
Adrian Gross (1,218 • 2006)
Kohl Meyers (2012)
Ethan Arnold (2022)

LIN-WOOD
Stanley Dovholuk (1976)
Natalie Haynes (1986)
Jamie Bourassa (1987)
Ryan Jones (1996)
Jeremy Nelson (1996)
Ross Macauley (2002)
Sarah LeClerc (2004)
Randi Mackay (2007)
Brandon Harrington (2018)

LISBON
Tom White (1973)
Russ Hubbard (1978)
Mike Hill (1979)
Linda Clough (1981)
Nikke Knighton (1988)
Steve Santa (1995)
Erica Elliott (1998)
Jeff Perham (1998)
Ed Natti (2003)
Tom White (2004)
Mike White (2007)
Jennifer White (2009)
Josh Woods (2018)

MASCENIC
Barbara Gerry (1981)
Kevin Rines (1989)
Heather Shaw (1990)
Brycen Blaine (1991)
Shannon Cunningham (1995)
Jason Starr (1999)
Chris Alix (2000)
Jared Stauffeneker (2014)
Daimon Gibson (2017)
Sam Stauffeneker (2019)
Shelby Babin (2020)

MASCOMA
Roger Cattabriga (1970)
James Martin (1980)
Jennifer Carter (1989)
Lynne Sullivan (1990)
Shannon Farrell (1990)
Aimee Beliveau (1991)
Joshua Chapman (1995)
Silas Ayres (2001)
Kati Lary (2002)
Katie Arey (2004)
Joy Depalo (2004)
Megan Evans (2004)
Tonya Young (2,012 • 2006)
Matt Pollard (2007)
Josh Poland (2009)
Alex Schwarz (2017)
Ben Seiler (2021)

MERRIMACK VALLEY
Laurie Moran (1,349 • 1985)
David Huckins Jr (1,479 • 1989)
Scott Drapeau (2,260 • 1991)
Brian Huckins (1,174 • 1994)
Brad Huckins (1,257 • 1999)
Greg Carbone (1,125 • 2001)
Ethan Lavoie (1,172 • 2002)
Amanda Wells (1,070 • 2005)
Alicia Jensen (1,031 • 2005)
Megan Hardiman (1,049 • 2011)
Justin Abbott (1,010 • 2012)
Abby Grandmaison (1,034 • 2018)
Carly Huckins (1,085 • 2019)

MOULTONBOROUGH
Matthew Swedberg (1,722 • 1987)
Lanette Burrows (1,078 • 1994)
Todd Engle (1,047 • 1994)
Marinda Cahoon (1,302 • 1996)
Ben Hallgren (1,132 • 1996)
Dan Ringelstein (1,181 • 1996)
Phil Cowels (1,084 • 2006)
Kevin Eisenberg (1,231 • 2009)
Drew Forsbert (1,077 • 2009)
Marcus Swedberg (1,090 • 2012)
Reese Swedberg (1,164 • 2018)

NEWMARKET
Jeff Monroe (1976)
Tom Nelson (1979)
Ralph Longa (1980)
Randy Edgerly (1986)
Kristine Gorski (1992)
Matt Gordon (1995)
Allyson Benvenuti (2001)
Chad Mastin (2002)
Duncan Szeliga (2005)
Curtis Williams (2009)
Christian Hawkins (2013)
Anthony Senesombath (2018)

NUTE
Jim Damon
Bruce Regan
Steve Burrows
Al Chiasson
Scott Burrows
Julie Donlon (2,502)
David Burrows (2,845)
Stacy Dube
Matt Cloutier
Stephen Lacasse
Shannon St. Lawrence
Conner Bradway

OYSTER RIVER
Steve Bamford (1960)
Randy Kinzly (1977)
Pat Galvin (1981)
Julie Sasner (1984 • 1,143)
Johanna Michel (1986)
John Freiermuth (1988)
Pat Casey (1989)
Jennifer Friel (1993)
Keith Friel (2,148 • 1996)
Greg Friel (1997)
Mike Casey (1999)
Jeremy Friel (2001)
Brittney Cross (2003 • 1,008)
Rick Laughton (2006)
Jilliane Friel (2009 • 1,136)
Danielle Walczak (2011 • 1,191)
Joe Morrell (2020)

PEMBROKE
Rick Morrill (1,290 • 1965)
Craig Keeler (1,255 • 1972)
Mark Yeaton (1,596 • 1973)
Steve Bodi (1,380 • 1976)
Alicia Young (1,016 • 1981)
Jim Sherman (1,021 • 1983)
Mike Drouin (1,198 • 1985)
Matt Alosa (2,575 • 1991)
Leslie Menard (1,048 • 1994)
Chris Barker (1,333 • 2002)
Kelly Thomas (1,202 • 2006)
Alex Hall (1,617 • 2009)
Matt Persons (1,080 • 2013)
Pat Welch (1,907 • 2014)
Noah Cummings (1,122 • 2019)
Sean Menard (1,087 • 2019)

PITTSFIELD
Kevin Riel (1970)
Jeff Jones (1972)
Tom Boyd (1976)
Krista Hast (1980)
Fred Hast (1981)
Mike Mitchell (1981)
Josh Lank (1990)
Wylie Mousseau (1994)
Michelle Meader (1996)
Tony Martinez (1997)
Dan Chapman (2000)
Nikki Hill (2006)
Sean Kryander (2006)
Chad Fennessey (2010)
Ben Hill (2011)
Donovan Emerson (2012)
Xenthios Cyr (2017)
Cam Darrah (2018)

PORTSMOUTH
James Best (1,161 points • 1984)
Strider Sulley (1,091 • 1989)
Aaron DeGraffe (1,129 • 2002)
John Mulvey (1,299 • 2009)
Amy Kinner (1,061 • 1995)
Andrea Herold (1,166 • 2001)
Libby Underwood (1,253 • 2017)
Joey Glynn (1,068 • 2017)
Cody Graham (1,440 • 2018)
Alex Tavares (1,030 • 2019)

PORTSMOUTH CHRISTIAN ACADEMY
Cassaundra Thorpe (2004)
Alicia Long (2006)
Lauren Andrews (2008)
Bryson Lund (2020)

PROFILE
Kelley Grautski (1,262 • 1983)
Kim Derrington (1,335 • 1987)
Brian Mcguigan (1,188 • 1989)
Gregg Dixon (1,242 • 1990)
Kris Hultgren (1,136 • 1995)
Justin Stroup (1,109 • 2002)
Kate Ramsey (1,104 • 2003)
Julia Houghtaling (1,391 • 2004)

PROSPECT MOUNTAIN (formerly Alton)
Frank Messier
Mike Lee
Jim Murray
Diane DeJager
Amy Birdsey
Pam Blackadar
Chris Irvin
Keri Pelletier
Heather Swabowicz
Kelly Lord
Eric O’Brien
Matt Pelletier
Ben Locke
Zach Christy
Terese Hopper

ST. THOMAS
Fran McNally (1964)
Terry Casey (1967)
Katie O’Keefe (1999)
Matt McLaughlin (2008)
Lindsay Towle (2018)
Andrew Cavanaugh (2019)

SOMERSWORTH
Chuck Favolise (1976)
Marc Roy (1979)
Jim Perron (1982)
Kyle Hodsdon (1984)
Diane Soule (1991)
John Coggeshall (1994)
Larry Francoeur Jr. (1997)
Melissa Heon (2000)
Katelyn Rideout (2002)
Rachel Hill (2013)
Bryton Early (2018)

SOUHEGAN
Rushmie Kalke (1995)
Courtney Banghart (1996)
Jesse Lynch (1996)
Jackie Lippe (1997)
Julie McLaurin (2003)
Jane White (2012)
Brandon Len (2013)
Mia Len (2018)

SPAULDING
Brad Therrien (1,700 • 1970)
Luke Croteau (1,595 • 2008)
Greg Lacasse (1,434 • 2001)
Tammy Fowler (1,299 • 2003)
Denny Hodgdon (1,236 • 1964)
Tiffany Bryant (1,194 • 1991)
Jacin Demers (1,107 • 1997)
Kelly Donohue (1,052 • 1997)
Deb LaValley (1,044 • 2009)
Dominic Paradis (1.098 • 2013)
Arie Breakfield (1,317 • 2019)

STRATFORD
Josh Stone (1993)
Troy Burns (1993)
Eric Hurlbert (1,780 • 1994)

SUNAPEE
David Muzzey (1986)
Beth Field (1988)
Trisha Shepard (1991)
Jennifer Colby (1995)
David Colby (1996)
Heather Wilkie (1997)
Meghan Wilkie (2001)
Jillian Hurd (2006)
Shawn Carpenter (2007)
Stephanie Larpenter (2009)
Liza Bourdon (2012)
Erika Waterman (2014)
Isaiah Chappell (2015)
Katie Frederick (2015)
Matt Tenney (2016)
Lexie Hamilton (2016)
Faith Larpenter (2017)
Sydney Clark (2017)

WILTON-LYNDEBOROUGH
Tom Conrad (1,058 • 1974)
Judy Harrison (1,258 • 1980)
Dean Larpenter (1,569 • 1982)
Steve Claire (1,212 • 1987)
Shauna Carter (1,297 • 1990)
Mike McMurray (1,780 • 1991)
Chris Jacob (1,034 • 1993)
DJ Garnham (1,040 • 1998)
Dave Sherman (1,472 • 2005)
Stephen Chin (1,037 • 2008)
Jordan Litts (1,116 • 2015)
Trey Carrier (1,242 • 2017)
Jack Schwab (1,241 • 2020)

WINDHAM
Clairee Putnam (2014)
Kaleigh Walsh (2018)
Sarah Dempsey (2021)

WINNISQUAM
Reeve Tracy (1955)
Bill Atherton (1965)
Tom Walsh (1967)
Mark Lavigne (1977)
Tim Nash (1,448 • 1984)
Raegan Jenkins (1,110 • 1991)
Matt McPhearson (1,155 • 2004)
Heidi Miller (1,164 • 2007)
Christian Serrano (1,585 • 2016)
Kyle Mann (1,022 • 2019)
Philip Nichols (1,051 • 2021)

WOODSVILLE
Ken Kinder (1,060 • 1986)
Jamie Walker (1,126 • 1988)
Chad Paronto (1,133 • 1993)
Ryan Ackerman (1,198 • 1999)
Jarrett Bemis (1,111 • 2016)
Cam Tenney-Burt (2022)

Smooth Moves of the Week (Jan. 2, 2021)

It’s time again for the Tropical Smoothie Cafe “Smooth Moves of the Week.” Tropical Smoothie Cafe was born on a beach where people know how to live. We like things fun and playful, sunny and bright. Shake your shoes off and turn the music up. It’s time to unwind… with the Tropical Smoothie Cafe “Smooth Moves of the Week”.

With locations in Rochester, Portsmouth, Portland and Biddeford, you’re on Tropic Time now.

TROPICAL SMOOTHIE CAFE LOCATIONS
Tropical Smoothie Cafe
127 Marketplace Blvd
Rochester, NH 03867

Tropical Smoothie Cafe
1600 Woodbury Avenue
Portsmouth, NH 03801

Tropical Smoothie Cafe
45 Western Ave
South Portland, ME 04106

Tropical Smoothie Cafe
426 Alfred Street
Biddeford, ME 04005

Recap: Day 3 at The Bash

FARMINGTON – The hump day of the 42nd Annual Mike Lee Holiday Basketball Bash featured 10 games, including four boys quarterfinals.

DAY 3: PHOTOS | ON-DEMAND VIDEO

While the boys quarters took place on the third day of The Bash, the girls stole the show as the most entertaining game of the tourney was an overtime battle between the Kennett and Concord Christian girls. The Division IV Kingsmen, featuring four eighth graders and two freshmen on their roster, gave the Division II Eagles all they could handle, but came up just short in overtime, 58-52.

Kennett advances to the title game out of the girls Pool A and will take on Pool B winner Coe-Brown in the championship game on Thursday at 5:30 pm.

The stage is now set for day four of the tourney, which features the final girls consolation game of the tournament, the Skills Competition and 3-Point Contest and then the boys semifinals. Jacob VanRyn and Sam Reynolds will be on the call for the boys semifinals.

Check out the remaining tournament schedule and recap of yesterday’s action below with graphics and highlight videos from all 10 games…

REMAINING SCHEDULE

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 29
GIRLS: Littleton vs. Farmington, 3:00 PM
Skills Competition, 4:45 PM
3-Point Contest, 5:15 PM
BOYS: Portsmouth Christian vs. Kennett, 6:00 PM
BOYS: Coe-Brown vs. Concord Christian, 7:30 PM

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 30: CHAMPIONSHIP DAY
GIRLS: Coe-Brown vs. Kennett, 5:30 PM
BOYS: Winner Game 12 vs. Winner Game 11, 7:00 PM

RECAP: December 28

BOYS
Profile 77, Nute 49
P: Alex Lesile 29, Josh Robie 26
N: Gavin Forcier 22, Anderson Levasseur 17
NOTE: Josh Robie was named to the All-Tournament Team

Profile’s Josh Robie was awarded his All-Tournament Team plaque before heading back north by Farmington Athletic Booster Club member Kevin Mosher.

Newmarket 57, Inter-Lakes 32
N: Colby Bost 19, Baris Fortier 10
I-L: Joey Doda 10, Owen Brown 10

Holy Family 64, Farmington 43
HF: Karl Yonkeu 28, Gabe Lacasse 18
FHS: Jordan Berko 12

Kennett 64, Epping 34
K: Ben Dougherty 23, Alex Clark 11
E: Owen Finkelstein 15

Concord Christian 64, St. Thomas 47
CCA: Isaac Jarvis 23, Brode Fink 16
STA: Will Mollica 14, Reece Rogers 12

Portsmouth Christian 59, Raymond 36
PCA: Seth Huggard 20, Jason Stockbower 15
RHS: Brady Potter 9

Coe-Brown 65, Derryfield 48
CBNA: Tommy Flanagan 13, Jack Lano 12, Brady Kouchhoukos 10, Connor Bagnell 10
D: Thomas Ferdinando 15, Alex Comire 11

GIRLS
Epping 37, Inter-Lakes 22
E: Mae McAniff 9
I-L: Molly Moynihan 8

Coe-Brown 49, Littleton 34
CBNA: Kalina Kasprzak 13, Alexis Cowan 10
L: Addison Hadlock 10

Kennett 58, Concord Christian 52
K: Sam Sidoti 15, Hope Elias 13, Sydnie Chin 11
CCA: Sarah Muir 16, Emma Smith 15

Two days down at The Bash

FARMINGTON – The second day of the 42nd Annual Mike Lee Holiday Basketball Bash featured nine games with bracket play starting on the boys side.

DAY 2: PHOTOS | ON-DEMAND VIDEO

The night cap between the Farmington and Derryfield boys was the day’s best game. The Tigers jumped out to an early lead on the Cougars and led by seven entering the fourth quarter, 40-33. Derryfield opened the final stanza on a 10-point run to take a 43-40 lead and came-from-behind to earn the 49-48 victory.

The stage is now set for day three of the tournament which features three boys consolation games, followed by three girls pool play events and concludes with four boys semifinals. Here is the schedule of events for day three and below is a recap of today’s events with graphics and highlight videos from all nine games.

DECEMBER 28 SCHEDULE

BOYS: Nute vs. Profile, 9:00 AM
BOYS: Newmarket vs. Inter-Lakes, 10:15 AM
BOYS: Farmington vs. Holy Family, 11:30 AM
GIRLS: Inter-Lakes vs. Epping, 12:45 PM
GIRLS: Coe-Brown vs. Littleton, 2:00 PM
GIRLS: Concord Christian vs. Kennett, 3:15 PM
BOYS: Epping vs. Kennett, 4:30 PM
BOYS: Concord Christian vs. St. Thomas Aquinas, 5:45 PM
BOYS: Raymond vs. Portsmouth Christian, 7:00 PM
BOYS: Derryfield vs. Coe-Brown, 8:15 PM

All events will be streamed live and be sure to follow us on FacebookInstagramTwitter and YouTube for the most recent updates throughout the tournament.

RECAP: December 27

BOYS
Concord Christian 61, Newmarket 51
CCA: Isaac Jarvis 22 points, Austin Spurr 10 points
N: Baris Fortier 23 points

Epping 65, Profile 51
E: Owen Finkelstein 18, Stamatis Maschas 18, Jacob Purington 11
P: Josh Robie 15, Alex Lesile 13, Karson Robie 12

Portsmouth Christian 63, Inter-Lakes 41
PCA: Jason Stockbower 17, Connor Hickey 15, Seth Huggard 14
I-L: Ben Beaudoin 13

Coe-Brown 63, Holy Family 33
CBNA: Jack Lano 26, Brady Kouchhoukos 12, Tommy Flanagan 11
HF: Karl Yonkeu 10, Gabe Lacasse 10

Raymond 63, Nute 56
R: Cohen Claytor 21, Drezell Duffaut 16, Paul Goding 11
N: Gavin Forcier 21, Picard Chase 16

Derryfield 49, Farmington 48
D: Jack Krasnof 19, Thomas Ferdinando 13
FHS: Jordan Berko 20, Luke Cardinal 11

GIRLS
Concord Christian 72, Epping 20
CCA: Megan Muir 10, Sarah Muir 15, Lilli Carlile 13
E: Laney McAniff 8

Kennett 71, Inter-Lakes 16
K: Sydnie Chin 15, Hope Elias 12, Kaley Goodhart 12, Kaylee Mclellan 12
I-L: Molly Monihan 7

Littleton 44, Farmington 24
L: Lauren McKee 20
FHS: Madison Ricker 14

Day one of The Bash in the Books

FARMINGTON – Day one of the 42nd Annual Mike Lee Holiday Basketball Bash featured nine games with some competition across divisions and some rivalries renewed. The opening day of The Bash welcomes teams to the tournament with a contest that is not part of bracket play.

DAY 1: PHOTOS | ON-DEMAND VIDEO

Yesterday’s game of the day was the Holy Family-Profile boys game that saw the Griffins come out on top, 68-66. The Patriots led early, but Holy Family came back to take a double-digit lead late before Profile mounted a come-back of its own. Profile sophomore Josh Robie set a tournament record with 11 three-point fields in a game en route to 33 points, while the Patriots all set the high-water mark with 15 threes as a team.

In the night cap, the Division IV Farmington boys jumped out to an 11-0 lead on old rival Coe-Brown and led 17-10 after the first quarter. The Division II Bears responded in the final three quarters to outscore the host Tigers 52-26 and come away with a 62-43 victory.

Bracket play for the boys and pool play for the girls gets underway today at 10:00 am.

RECAP: DECEMBER 26

BOYS
St. Thomas Aquinas 82, Nute 42
S: Ethan Berg (SR/F): 17 points, Vinny Simonelli (SR/G) 12 points, Zijie Dang (JR/G) 11 points
N: Gavin Forcier (JR/G): 22 points, Jackson LaFogg (FR/G) 14 points)

Holy Family 68, Profile 66
HF: Gabe Lacasse (SO/G) 20 points, Sean Sullivan (JR/F) 17 points, Karl Yonkeu (SR/F) 12 points
P: Josh Robie (SO/G) 33 points*, Karsen Robie (SO/G) 11 points, Alex Leslie (SO/F) 14 points
NOTABLE: Josh Robie: tournament record 11 three-point fields goals, Profile: tournament record 15 three-point field goals

Epping 49, Newmarket: 60
E: Owen Finkelstein (SR/F) 20 points, Stamatis Maschas (SR/F) 10 points
N: Colby Bost (SR/F) 19 points, Baris Fortier (SO/F) 15 points, Jameson Senesombath (JR/G) 12 points

Kennett 65, Derryfield 46
K: Grady Livingston (SR/G) 16 points, Isaiah Mojica (SR/G) 10 points
D: Ethan Flannigan (JR/G) 12 points, Thomas Ferdanando (FR/G) 16 points

Concord Christian 80, Portsmouth Christian 43
CCA: Isaac Jarvis (SR/F) 23 points, Brode Frink (FR) 12 points, Jake Turner (SR) 15 points
PCA: Jason Stockbower (SR/G) 15 points

Coe-Brown 62, Farmington 43
CBNA: Jack Lano (SR/F) 14 points, Nate Ford (JR/G) 13 points, Tommy Flanagan (JR/C) 12 points,
FHS: Brian Weeks (SR/G) 11 points, Shawn Murphy (SO/F) 10 points

GIRLS
Kennett 65, Epping 7
K: Hope Elias (JR/G) 14 points, Kaylee Mclellan (JR/G) 12 points
E: Mae McAniff (SO/G) 6 points

Concord Christian 76, Inter-Lakes 17
CCA: Sarah Muir (8th/G) 17 points, Megan Muir (SO/G) 16 points, Emma Smith (8th/G) 15 points, Lilli Carlile (FR/G) 12 points
IL: Caitlyn Clark (SR) 8 points

Coe-Brown 49, Farmington 22
CBNA: Emma Broadstone (JR/G) 13 points
FHS: Makayla Lapanne (JR/G) 8 points

TODAY’S SCHEDULE: DECEMBER 27

BOYS: Concord Christian vs. Newmarket, 10:00 am
GIRLS: Concord Christian vs. Epping, 11:15 am
BOYS: Profile vs. Epping, 12:30 pm
GIRLS: Inter-Lakes vs. Kennett, 1:45 pm
BOYS: Inter-Lakes vs. Portsmouth Christian, 3:00 pm
BOYS: Coe-Brown vs. Holy Family, 4:15 pm
BOYS: Raymond vs. Nute, 5:30 pm
GIRLS: Littleton vs. Farmington, 6:45 pm
BOYS: Derryfield vs. Farmington, 8:00 pm

All events will be streamed live and be sure to follow us on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and YouTube for the most recent updates throughout the tournament.

Let’s Bash!

The 42nd Annual Mike Lee Holiday Basketball Bash runs Dec. 26-30 and we’ve got you covered with live action of all 35 games of the five-day event. New Hampshire’s largest and the Seacoast’s longest-running holiday basketball tournament will feature live streams of each game, photos, video highlights and more. 

Video productions by Pack Network throughout the tournament ramp up each day and culminating with TV-broadcast quality coverage of the boys and girls finals on Dec. 30. 

Stay tuned to Ball 603 all week long. Enjoy the show!

WATCH LIVE HERE